IN THE NEWS!

 
 
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Ms. Magazine - “Her Land is Our Land: How Beatrix Farrand Changed the Landscape of the Nation”
March 2019, Karen Waltuch

‘In her lifetime, Beatrix Farrand would design more than 200 private and public gardens—always with her distinct eye for intricate detail and perfection in execution, and in spite of numerous gender-based barriers to her own success…’

 
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Hudson Valley Magazine - “Discover the Secret Garden at This Historic Hyde Park Estate”
February 2019, Sabrina Sucato

‘Do you remember reading The Secret Garden? Frances Hodgson Burnett’s 1911 novel, along with the 1949 and 1993 movie renditions that followed, charmed readers with the concept of a secret paradise in the heart of an English estate. While the emotional ups and downs of the story drove audiences to the final chapter, the  allure of a secluded oasis in the heart of society remains at the core of the tale’s undeniable magic…”

 
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Martha Stewart - “Inside Famed Landscape Designer Beatrix Farrand's New York Garden”
May 2017, Marilyn Young

‘“It is work, hard work . . . and at the same time, it is perpetual pleasure.” That’s how Beatrix Farrand, one of the most influential garden designers of the early 20th century, described her life’s calling. The niece of Edith Wharton, Farrand was the only female charter member of the American Society of Landscape Architects, founded in 1899. Over her 50-year career, she designed estates for the Morgans and Rockefellers, and spaces for Princeton and Yale Universities, as well as her lavish masterpiece, Dumbarton Oaks, in Washington, D.C. But tragically, few of her residential creations survive…’

 
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Old House Online - “Re-creating a 1912 Garden”
March 2010, Judith B. Tankard

‘The estate gardens designed by Beatrix Farrand are hardly known for their coziness—or for low-maintenance demands.

Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C., for instance, stretches for many acres and requires a large team of gardeners, while the fabled rose garden at the New York Botanical Garden needs vigilant upkeep for literally thousands of display plants. But tucked away in a corner of the Roosevelt National Historic Site in Hyde Park, New York, an enchanting and intimate garden by Farrand has been restored…’